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Face masks in Estonian national colours.


On Monday Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus sent an important message to the world during the online press briefing from the United Nations headquarters in Geneva: “By wearing a mask, you're sending a powerful message to those around you that we’re all in this together.” He noted, “Wear a mask, when appropriate, keep your physical distance from others and avoid crowded places. Observe coughing etiquette, clear your hands frequently and you'll be protecting yourself and others. The message to people and governments is clear: Do it all.” From 7 th July according to City of Toronto By-Law 541-2020 everybody is required to wear a face mask or face covering inside public spaces. Similar regulations are in place in many other cities in Canada. Over the past months COVID-19 pandemic situation has brought many changes to our everyday lives. Many responsible people have come out with many new initiatives during this extraordinary time and they make a personal contribution to the health of our citizens. Among them is Stephanie Raudsepp, who is well known to the Montreal Estonian community. She is a talented young artist, bookbinder and stationery designer, who started in the beginning of July her new project of making face masks. She has already designed almost two dozen masks featuring her artwork. These can be found in the link through her website www.stephanieraudsepp.com These masks are made on demand to minimize waste and also depend on the custom size requirements of each customer. Among these beautiful designs by Stephanie Raudsepp are also the face masks in Estonian national colours blue, balk, and white.
Stephanie Raudsepp - Photo by Matthew Raudsepp (2020)

On Monday Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus sent an important message to the world during the online press briefing from the United Nations headquarters in Geneva: “By wearing a mask, you’re sending a powerful message to those around you that we’re all in this together.” He noted, “Wear a mask, when appropriate, keep your physical distance from others and avoid crowded places. Observe coughing etiquette, clear your hands frequently and you’ll be protecting yourself and others. The message to people and governments is clear: Do it all.” From 7 th July according to City of Toronto By-Law 541-2020 everybody is required to wear a face mask or face covering inside public spaces. Similar regulations are in place in many other cities in Canada. Over the past months COVID-19 pandemic situation has brought many changes to our everyday lives. Many responsible people have come out with many new initiatives during this extraordinary time and they make a personal contribution to the health of our citizens. Among them is Stephanie Raudsepp, who is well known to the Montreal Estonian community. She is a talented young artist, bookbinder and stationery designer, who started in the beginning of July her new project of making face masks. She has already designed almost two dozen masks featuring her artwork. These can be found in the link through her website www.stephanieraudsepp.com These masks are made on demand to minimize waste and also depend on the custom size requirements of each customer. Among these beautiful designs by Stephanie Raudsepp are also the face masks in Estonian national colours blue, balk, and white.

Interview with the artist Stephanie Raudsepp

1. When did you start making the face masks? What inspired you? Are some of your face masks unique?
What materials are you using? How many layers? Where did you get the design?
What advice would you give to a person who would be interested to make their own face mask?

I began making face masks in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. In Quebec, it is mandatory to wear a mask in all public spaces as of mid-July. I had been doing so myself for many months already. However, wearing disposable masks or scarves (back in March when it was still cold) is not sustainable, for myself or the environment.

I have also been running a hand-crafted stationery design business which had been flattened, like so many others, when the pandemic hit.

(Continue reading here: Estonian Life No. 32 2020 paper- and PDF/digi)

Ülle Baum interview with Stephanie Raudsepp.

Photo by: Karl Raudsepp (2020)


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